Guide for "Disabled" festival goers:

Time to swap my shorts for ski pants, for Biffy to become less shirt-less and the butty vans to return back to their industrial estates.  Yes, it’s sadly that time of year. The British summer music festivals have all come to a close. As the abandoned blow up beds and tents finally lay to rest in landfill sights, i thought it was only fitting that I compile a guide for next years disabled festival goers.

Wheelchair-aerial view of The Killers at T – July 2013

Is the “Disabled Campsite” for you?
For first timers, it’s about making the decision on whether to use the “disabled” camping facilities or not. Festivals are pretty open as to what defines a “disability” and a large number of different people are now making use of the facilities on offer. I’ve met people with Chrone’s disease, autism, visual impairment, MS and bumped into the odd spinal cord injured friend. Large festivals, like Reading for instance, are now asking for proof of disability when you register for disabled camping. (They tend to ask you for a copy/scan of your DLA letter.)

Still not sure?  Liberty with autism says “it’s quieter than the other camps and there’s always staff to help.” Iain, who’s deaf, likes to use the “disabled access because it’s easier for all the deaf friends to stay close without having to stress too much as it can be hard to hear with all the crowd making noise!” He also mentioned that he loves the atmosphere of the disabled campsite and feels safer as there are less people which makes it easier when people aren’t necessarily deaf aware.

If you are opting to book and register for disabled camping:

  • Make use of the “2 for 1” carer tickets available.
  • Book and register for disabled camping tickets as soon as possible, so you’re not disappointed…
  • Put the “Disabled registration date” in your diary! Most festivals don’t open up their registration up until about 2/3 months before the festival, don’t buy your tickets and then forget to register!
  • It will give you and (usually one other person) access to Disabled viewing platforms.
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